C19 Notes

Array of symptoms

Author Topic: Array of symptoms  (Read 1366 times)

stog

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Array of symptoms
« on: May 15, 2020, 02:50:45 PM »
An array of symptoms is described and was experienced by Paul Garner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.

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He had a muggy head, upset stomach, tinnitus, pins and needles, breathlessness, dizziness and arthritis in the hands. Each time Garner thought he was getting better the illness roared back. It was a sort of virus snakes and ladders.

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“I’m a public health person,” he says. “The virus is certainly causing lots of immunological changes in the body, lots of strange pathology that we don’t yet understand. This is a novel disease. And an outrageous one. The textbooks haven’t been written.”


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/15/weird-hell-professor-advent-calendar-covid-19-symptoms-paul-garner
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 10:01:33 AM by stog »

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms Covid toes
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2020, 05:55:14 PM »
As the world continues to struggle with the COVID-19 pandemic, new symptoms of the virus continue to be identified. One such symptom, purple or red lesions on the toes and hands, has been dubbed “COVID toes” and has gained attention over recent weeks.

https://www.healio.com/dermatology/dermatitis/news/online/%7B1f54025b-e860-4862-979d-46daebae6818%7D/covid-toes-tracking-dermatological-symptoms-of-covid-19

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms - strokes and clotting
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2020, 09:42:57 AM »
Many researchers suspect strokes in novel coronavirus patients may be a direct consequence of blood problems that are producing clots all over some people’s bodies.


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As Oxley, an interventional neurologist, began the procedure to remove the clot, he observed something he had never seen before. On the monitors, the brain typically shows up as a tangle of black squiggles – “like a can of spaghetti,” he said – that provide a map of blood vessels. A clot shows up as a blank spot. As he used a needlelike device to pull out the clot, he saw new clots forming in real time around it.
“This is crazy,” he remembers telling his boss.



https://www.boston.com/news/coronavirus/2020/04/24/covid-19-strokes

also see https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2009787? which reports Large-Vessel Stroke as a Presenting Feature of Covid-19 in the Young
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Cough, headache, and chills lasting 1 week developed in a previously healthy 33-year-old woman (Patient 1) (Table 1). She then had progressive dysarthria with both numbness and weakness in the left arm and left leg over a period of 28 hours. She delayed seeking emergency care because of fear of Covid-19
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 12:18:53 PM by stog »

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms - children
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2020, 11:51:32 AM »

Symptoms for patients up to 21 years old, experiencing what doctors are calling "pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome," include:
    • Persistent fever and inflammation
    • Abnormal, sudden or rapid heart rhythm
    • Rash
    • Diarrhoea Diarrhea and vomiting
    • Weak pulse and rapid breathing
    • Dizziness or loss of consciousness
Doctors in Italian hospital report "30-fold" jump in kids with inflammatory symptomsA hospital in the epicenter of Italy's coronavirus outbreak has seen a 30-fold increase of children with severe inflammatory symptoms most often associated with Kawasaki-like disease, according to a study published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet.



https://www.axios.com/coronavirus-children-italy-hospital-d58a9578-b7e4-4d9a-80ce-e3c66713490c.html
« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 12:55:23 PM by stog »

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms - kawasaki skin on white and darker skin
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2020, 04:49:43 PM »
Image may contain: one or more people, possible text that says 'KAWASAKI DISEASE COMPARISON'

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms - test for children most at risk
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2020, 10:09:20 AM »
Doctors raise hopes of blood test for children with coronavirus-linked syndrome

Doctors have identified a group of blood compounds that may help to reveal which children are most at risk of developing a rare but life-threatening immune reaction to coronavirus.
Researchers at Imperial College London analysed blood from some of the sickest children and found they had high levels of five compounds that can be measured in routine tests. Two of the compounds, ferritin and C-reactive protein or CRP, are common blood markers for inflammation. The others are linked to heart damage and blood clotting, namely troponin, BNP and so-called “D-dimers”.



https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/may/17/possible-breakthrough-in-coronavirus-related-syndrome-in-children

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 12:59:31 PM »
The World Health Organization says along with the most common symptoms of fever, cough and tiredness, people may have:
  • aches and pains
  • sore throat
  • diarrhoea
  • conjunctivitis (red eye)
  • headache
  • loss of taste or smell
  • a rash on skin, or discolouration of fingers or toes

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms--chronic symptomology
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2020, 09:50:21 AM »
Last month, the Guardian published an interview with Paul Garner, a professor of infectious diseases, about his experience of Covid-19. The piece was shared widely and viewed nearly 1m times. Readers got in touch to say they too were suffering from lingering and often strange Covid-19 symptoms.

It appears coronavirus may be a chronic condition. How long it persists for is unknown. The symptoms can be serious and wide-ranging, affecting the lungs, heart, brain, kidneys, stomach and nervous system. Headaches, shortness of breath, sore throat and feeling exhausted are common. So is recovery followed by frequent relapses. Here are the stories of four women who are struggling to return to normal life.



https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/07/it-feels-endless-four-women-struggling-to-recover-from-covid-19-coronavirus-symptoms
« Last Edit: June 08, 2020, 10:01:36 AM by stog »

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms--chronic symptomology
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2020, 10:01:11 AM »
Peter Piot, 71, one of the giants of Ebola and AIDS research, is still battling a coronavirus infection that hit him “like a bus” in March.


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“This is the revenge of the viruses,” said Dr. Peter Piot, the director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. “I’ve made their lives difficult. Now they’re trying to get me.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/26/health/coronavirus-peter-piot.html

stog

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Re: Array of symptoms - chronic symptoms
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2020, 11:01:12 AM »

stog

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multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2020, 03:09:28 PM »
July 2 2020
New data from active surveillance of the severe inflammatory condition associated with COVID-19 in previously healthy children provide further insight into the prevalence and course of the rare syndrome, but experts are concerned that current diagnostic criteria may not capture the true scope of the problem.

In separate reports published online June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from the New York State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describe the epidemiology and clinical features of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) on the basis of information derived from targeted surveillance programs in New York State and across the country.


All children presented with fever or chills, and most had tachycardia (97%) and gastrointestinal symptoms (80%). Rash (60%), conjunctival injection (56%), hypotension (32%), and mucosal changes (27%) were reported. Among all of the children, levels of inflammatory markers were elevated, including levels of C-reactive protein (100%), d-dimer (91%), and troponin (71%). More than one third of the patients (36%) were diagnosed with myocarditis, and an additional 16% had clinical myocarditis.
Of the full cohort, 80% of the children required intensive care, 62% received vasopressor support, and two children died.
The high prevalence of cardiac dysfunction or depression, coagulopathy, gastrointestinal symptoms, mild respiratory symptoms, and indications for supplemental oxygen in patients with MIS-C stands in contrast to the clinical picture observed in most acute cases of COVID-19 in hospitalized children, the authors write.
"Although most children have mild or no illness from SARS-CoV-2 infection, MIS-C may follow Covid-19 or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recognition of the syndrome and early identification of children with MIS-C, including early monitoring of blood pressure and electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation, could inform appropriate supportive care and other potential therapeutic options," they continue.








https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/933303

stog

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Children with COVID-19-related pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) may experience neurologic symptoms that involve the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system, new research suggests.
In a case-series study of 27 children with COVID-19 MIS at a hospital in London, United Kingdom, four presented with new-onset symptoms that included headache, brainstem and cerebellar signs, encephalopathy, muscle weakness, and reduced reflexes.
After the patients were admitted to an intensive care unit, MRI scans showed splenium signal changes in all four patients. In addition, a "mild excess of slow activity" was found in the three children who underwent electroencephalography, and mild myopathic and neuropathic changes were found in the three who underwent nerve conduction measures and electromyography.
By end of study, all four showed neurologic improvement, and two had made a full recovery.
"Additional research is needed to assess the association of neurological symptoms with immune-mediated changes among children with COVID-19," write the investigators, led by Omar Abdel-Mannan, MD, Department of Neurology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London.
The findings were published online July 1 in JAMA Neurology.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/933311

 

stog

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UK neurologists publish details of mildly affected or recovering Covid-19 patients with serious or potentially fatal brain conditions

Doctors may be missing signs of serious and potentially fatal brain disorders triggered by coronavirus, as they emerge in mildly affected or recovering patients, scientists have warned.
Neurologists are on Wednesday publishing details of more than 40 UK Covid-19 patients whose complications ranged from brain inflammation and delirium to nerve damage and stroke. In some cases, the neurological problem was the patient’s first and main symptom.
The cases, published in the journal Brain, revealed a rise in a life-threatening condition called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (Adem), as the first wave of infections swept through Britain. At UCL’s Institute of Neurology, Adem cases rose from one a month before the pandemic to two or three per week in April and May. One woman, who was 59, died of the complication.
                     Read more      A dozen patients had inflammation of the central nervous system, 10 had brain disease with delirium or psychosis, eight had strokes and a further eight had peripheral nerve problems, mostly diagnosed as Guillain-Barré syndrome, an immune reaction that attacks the nerves and causes paralysis. It is fatal in 5% of cases.
“We’re seeing things in the way Covid-19 affects the brain that we haven’t seen before with other viruses,” said Michael Zandi, a senior author on the study and a consultant at the institute and University College London Hospitals NHS foundation trust.
“What we’ve seen with some of these Adem patients, and in other patients, is you can have severe neurology, you can be quite sick, but actually have trivial lung disease,” he added.



https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jul/08/warning-of-serious-brain-disorders-in-people-with-mild-covid-symptoms